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MEG 2700 Fluid Mechanics: Articles - 8th edition

MLA 8th Edition

Page numbers -- preceed numbers with p. or pp.

Identify volumes and issue numbers --  vol. 64, no. 3

For online works the DOI is preferred.  If DOI is not available, provide a STABLE (Permalink) URL without http:// or https://.

 

Scholarly Journal or Magazine?

How can you tell if an article is scholarly or from a magazine?

If you get your article from an online database, you can usually limit your results list to just scholarly journals.  If you are using a print copy, here's some tips: 

1. Scholarly journals report on original research and usually include charts, graphs and formulas.  The articles are lengthy and usually have headings like method or methodology, results, and conclusion and include a bibliography.   Examples of scholarly journals are American Journal of Education, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, and Modern Fiction Studies.

2. Magazine articles are written to inform and entertain a general audience. They may be news magazines, sports interest, cultural and social news, or a variety of topics features.  They usually have colorful covers, lots of photos and advertisements.  Articles are usually brief but can be longer and they seldom have a bibliography.  Examples of magazines are Newsweek, Good Housekeeping, and Popular Mechanics. 

Journal & Magazine Citations

Scholarly Journal (print format):

For two authors, list the authors in the order they appear on the title page. List the first author with the last name first; list the second author with the first name followed by the last name.

Example:


Scholarly Journal (from online database):

No http:// necessary for the URL.
Cite the database (Academic Search Premier), not the interface (EBSCOHost).
Make sure the URL is a Persistent link or Permalink and not a “search” link.  Look for those terms or Bookmark to identify persistent links.

Example:


Scholarly Journal with 3+ Authors (from online database)

For three or more authors, reverse the name of the first author and follow it with a comma and et al.(p.22).

The DOI (Digital Object Identifier), if available, is preferred over an URL.

Example:


Magazine (print format):

If an author is listed, begin with the name of the author. If no author is listed, begin with the title of the article.

Example:


Magazine (from online database):

Cite the article as you would a print article, followed by:

  • database in which you accessed the article
  • medium of publication (Web)
  • date of access

Example:


Newspaper (print format):

Because newspaper articles often don’t appear on consecutive pages, cite the section and page number where the article begins. If the article continues onto additional pages, note this by placing a + sign after the page number.

Signed Article

Example:

Unsigned Article

If the article is unsigned, begin with the title of the article. Omit "A," " An," or "The" if the title begins this way.

Example:


Newspaper (from online database):

Cite the article as you would a print article, followed by the database in which you accessed the article, the medium of publication (Web), and the date of access.

Example: